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  Mon Apr 23

Horsey Tips And Hints

    • When u go to clean anything silver or metal or chrome in ur tack next time use toothpaste or tomato sauce. Both of these substances clean very well because they contain acid which is in most cleaning products. My Ponies favourite would be toothpaste as it does taste yummy!!

    • If your pony or horse makes it hard for you to put the bit in it's mouth then i have found a solution for you! Next time bring some carrots with you and then put them in your hand when you try to put the bit in your pony's or horse's mouth, this way it will open it's mouth to eat the carrot and you can slip the bit in it's mouth! taaadaaa

    • He knows when you're happy He knows when you're comfortable He knows when you're confident And he always knows when you have carrots

    • Don't look a horse in the eye when you're going to catch it. Look slightly to the side and keep your rope and halter just away from his view.

    • It is a good idea to use goodies such as pony pellets, carrots, apples or sugar lumps to reward your horse when you catch it. Carry them in a crinkly plastic bag. This will get him used to plastic bags which spook most horses and appear right when you don't want them. It can also be useful in emergencies so he will always come to the sound of you rustling a bag. 

    • Got extremely nasty knots in your mane or tail? I'm not talking tangles, I am talking things you'd get the scissors out for..CRC or WD40 - just spray it in and out come the knots, dont use a comb or brush, just untangle with your hands. seems odd, but trust me - we've had some nasties in the past and it never fails plus leaves it nice and shiny!

    • I use pop top lids on my shampoo bottles, makes life easier, i buy in bulk & put Glo-White & shampoo in smaller bottles & then add a pop top lid, great show show day! A hack saw blade is good for pulling out a winter coat. Mr Sheen for a coat shine spray.

    • Wash and dry the wound making sure it is clean and free of any foreign bodies. Once area is bone dry cut a piece big enough to cover the wound, peal and stick the Fixamol over the area (it will not stick if the area is even slightly damp). This stays on the area until it falls off by itself. You can continue washing the area with betadene or whatever through the skin but it stops anything getting in and flys etc. Quite a useful product.

    • Save your yoghurt tubs, they make good feed scoops. Or cut the cordial bottles in half, that gives you the equivalent to a plastic scoop RRP $9.95! Pffft!

    • Clean your bit with toothpaste, the abrasiveness helps...this also works well in grey tails.

    • Um....buy a bay, not a grey, then you dont have to wash them as often!

   
  Mon Apr 23

Article: Equine Dentistry * An Article By Tom Judd, D.V.M.

Each year I make every effort to attend the International Association of Equine Dentistry (IAED) conference somewhere in the United States. If I cannot attend this conference, then I will do my best to participate in an affiliated dental group's continuing education opportunities. Many regard the IAED as the premier organization representing equine dental technicians and veterinarians in equine dentistry. One of IAED's most exciting features is their certification program. Currently two levels of certification are offered, basic and advanced. The standard of dental care of basic certification is head and shoulders above the level of dentistry being offered by most equine practitioners and lay dentists. One of my primary interests is equine dentistry, and for many years I have been striving to increase the quality of the equine dentistry I practice. Joining IAED and working up through the certification levels is another stepping stone in my ongoing attempt to offer the best dentistry possible in the area.

Let's start by delineating some of the differences between “routine floating” and progressive equine veterinary dentistry. As many of you know “points” are one of the first things that many owners notice when a horse's mouth starts to become out of balance.

Points are sharp edges of enamel that start to protrude on the buccal (cheek side) of the upper premolars and molars and on the lingual (tongue side) of the lower cheek teeth. The premolars and molars are the large grinding teeth that are situated behind the area taken up by the bit and extend backwards approximately 8”. Floating teeth has basically meant the removal of these points. Progressive dentistry addresses not only the removal of these points, but also takes into account many other factors of equine dentition, for example, removing hooks, ramps and rims which are some of the abnormalities of molars that are often left poorly addressed in a routine float. Other aspects of progressive dentistry include reducing waves, overgrown molars (high molars or steps), re-establishing molar table angles, creating uniform bit seats, incisor maintenance, conservatively reducing canines (not to be confused with wolf teeth) and removing wolf teeth and deciduous teeth (caps). We will go into each of these subjects in more detail next.

Hooks are defined as being an overgrowth of tooth that is taller than deep. After point formation, hooks are probably the most commonly discovered abnormality. They usually form as sharp, fanglike projections on the upper first cheek teeth and the lower last cheek teeth.

Ramps are defined as an overgrowth of tooth longer in depth than in height. Ramps are the next most commonly seen anomaly second to hooks. They involve more tooth body; therefore, are more difficult to remove.

Rims are formed on an individual tooth when the center of the occlusal (grinding) surface becomes worn down compared to the outer edge of the tooth.

Wave formation involves an overgrowth of tooth in more than one consecutive tooth. Since waves involve more than one tooth, they may require a rather large amount of tooth reduction and can be quite involved. Viewed from the side a wave looks just like its namesake. An elevation in the molar surface corresponds with an indentation in the molar surface opposite it.

Overgrown molars can be caused from the lack of an opposing tooth or because of the super-eruption of the offending tooth which causes excessive wear on the opposing molar. These teeth can be handled either by carefully grinding or cutting them back to normal height.

Bit seat creation involves placing shallow angles into the very front edge of the upper and lower first cheek teeth. Creating a bit seat in the leading edge of the first cheek teeth gives the soft tissues of the mouth (tongue, inside edge of the corners of the lips and cheeks) a comfortable place to rest while a bit is in use.

Incisor maintenance refers to making sure the length of the incisors (front, grass shearing teeth) is in correct proportion to the length of the molars. If the incisors are too long it keeps the molars out of contact with each other during a chewing cycle. If the molars are too long in relation to the incisors this won't allow the incisors to come together completely. We can judge molar and incisor proportion by observing the effect of lateral movement of the jaw. Keeping the incisor length proportionate to the molar length and adjusting the molar table angle to 10 to 15 degrees allows the horse to achieve maximum efficiency of feed breakup and therefore utilization. We look for a stem length of no longer than 3/8” in the manure to assess grinding efficency.

Canine reduction involves the conservative shortening and blunting of the canine teeth when they are present. Many authorities in equine dentistry now recommend this procedure since it serves a number of purposes. Canine reduction contributes to making things more comfortable when bitting the horse, they are less likely to abrade the horse's tongue and cause less injury to the hands of anyone examining or working in the horse's mouth and can prevent or slow tartar formation at this common area for tartar buildup.

Wolf teeth are small permanent teeth that erupt usually within the first year or two of the horse's life. The crown (the part of the tooth visible above the gum) usually averages about the size of a pencil eraser. When present, this tooth sits just in front of the first upper cheek teeth and has the high probability of causing potential bitting problems. With proper levels of sedation and analgesia (pain relief) they are usually removed quite easily.

Deciduous teeth are baby teeth that erupt and exist in the young horse's mouth from birth through 4.5 years old. They exist for the incisors and first three upper and lower cheek teeth (pre-molars). Deciduous teeth are often called “caps” and like a loosening baby tooth in humans can be quite uncomfortable for several weeks prior to their natural falling out. When loosening caps are discovered during a dental exam they should be removed at that time.

The above information demonstrates the complexity of equine dentistry when it is approached with the goal of balancing the equine mouth. Please see the photographs of actual cases, diagrams and articles linked to our dental page to learn more and better understand what's going on inside your horse's mouth. The above information demonstrates the complexity of equine dentistry when it is approached with the goal of balancing the equine mouth. 

   
  Mon Mar 05

Can You Teach a Dumb Dog New Tricks?

If your canine seems clueless, it may be that it has been bred to be more independent, or not so eager to please its owner, Yin says.

Training will require more patience and the right kind of motivation, whether it's praise, petting, or treats.

"For breeds, instincts make a difference, but for the basics - 'sit,' 'come,' 'down' - they'll all learn at the same rate. With good technique, the difference might be a month," she says.

Her Australian cattle dog, for example, stays at her side when they're out and loves a pat on the head. Her Jack Russell terrier, a high-energy breed that didn't make the smart list, has to be rewarded lickety-split with a treat or he'll lose interest in learning. A pat on the head just won't do it.

The beagle, a breed trained to work independently, probably needs more training time, Yin says. And the bulldog, which scored well below average on obedience tests, can learn quickly - as long as he doesn't feel pushed around or punished

The beagle and bulldog are among the dog breeds on the bottom of Coren's list. These dogs had to hear commands 80 to 100 times or more before they obeyed them 25% or less of the time. They include:

1. Shih Tzu 2. Bassett hound 3. Mastiff/Beagle (tied) 4. Pekingnese 5. Bloodhound 6. Borzoi 7. Chow Chow 8. Bulldog 9. Basenji 10. Afghan hound (least obedient)
Redenbach doesn't like categorizing dogs as smart or dumb; she says that's too simplistic. Like Yin, she says positive and consistent training will make a good dog.

"The number of intelligent dogs I have met has been on the increase over the years, because the better trainer I become, the smarter I see they are," Redenbach says.

   
  Wed Feb 07

Dogs Can Detect if someone has Cancer

Dogs can detect if someone has cancer

Dogs can detect if someone has cancer just by sniffing the person's breath, a new study shows.

Dogs can identify chemical traces in the range of parts per trillion. Previous studies have confirmed the ability of trained dogs to detect skin-cancer melanomas by sniffing skin lesions.

Also, some researchers hope to prove dogs can detect prostate cancer by smelling patients' urine.

Lung- and breast-cancer patients are known to exhale patterns of biochemical markers in their breath.

"Cancer cells emit different metabolic waste products than normal cells," Broffman said. "The differences between these metabolic products are so great that they can be detected by a dog's keen sense of smell, even in the early stages of disease."

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/01/0112_060112_dog_cancer.html

   
  Sun Feb 04

St. Bernard

While I was Researching The St. Bernard. I found this:

Barry der Menschenretter (1800–1814), also known as Barry, was a dog of a breed which was later called the St. Bernard that worked as a mountain rescue dog in Switzerland for the Great St Bernard Hospice. He predates the modern St. Bernard, and was lighter built than the modern breed. He has been described as the most famous St. Bernard, as he was credited with saving more than 40 lives during his lifetime.

The legend surrounding him was that he was killed while attempting a rescue; however, this is untrue. Barry retired to Bern, Switzerland and after his death his body was passed into the care of the Natural History Museum of Bern. His skin has been preserved through taxidermy although his skull was modified in 1923 to match the Saint Bernard of that time period. His story and name have been used in literary works, and a monument to him stands in the Cimetière des Chiens near Paris. At the hospice one dog has always been named Barry in his honor and since 2004 the Foundation Barry du Grand Saint Bernard has been set up to take over the responsibility for breeding dogs from the hospice.
TODAY:
St. Bernard dogs are no longer used for Alpine rescues, the last recorded instance of which was in 1955. As late as 2004, the Great St Bernard Hospice still maintained 18 of the dogs for reasons of tradition and sentiment. In that year the Barry Foundation created breeding kennels for the breed at the town of Martigny down the Pass, and purchased the remaining dogs from the Hospice.

The animals bred by the Foundation are trained to participate in a variety of dog sports including carting and weight pulling. The dogs at the Barry Foundation are reportedly smaller than the average St Bernard.

Temperament:
Known as a classic example of a Gentle Giant, the Saint Bernard is calm, patient and sweet with adults, and especially children. However St. Bernards, like all very large dogs, must be well socialized with people and other dogs in order to prevent fearfulness and any possible aggression or territoriality. The biggest threat to small children is being knocked over by this breed's larger size. Overall they are a sweet, gentle, calm, loyal and affectionate breed, and if socialized are very friendly. Because of its large adult size, it is essential that proper training and socialization begin while the St. Bernard is still a puppy, so as to avoid the difficulties that normally accompany training large dogs. An unruly St. Bernard may present problems for even a strong adult, so control needs to be asserted from the beginning of the dog's training. While generally not instinctively protective, a St. Bernard may bark at strangers, and their size makes them good deterrents against possible intruders

   
  Tue Jan 23

Blanket Chart

Horse blanket2: Here's how to choose the best blanket for your horse.

 

Horse blanket2: Choosing A Blanket for Your Horse

Here are 5 factors you must consider when choosing and using a blanket for your horse.

1. Fabric: Nylon is very strong and resilient and it doesn't hold stains, but it's very expensive. Polyester is lightweight, more affordable, and but it’s not as strong as nylon. A blend often gives you the best of both worlds.  The strength (and thus durability) of a blanket's outer layer is expressed in denier units  The higher the denier number, the stronger the material. It takes a 1,200-denier polyester to match the strength of only 840-denier nylon.

2. Linings: Polycotton, nylon, and fleece-like wicking material are the most common. Many people prefer a wicking liner because it's more breathable than the others, and breathable blankets are usually healthier and warmer for your horse.

3. Fit: Measure from the center of the chest at the point of the shoulder, around the shoulder, along the barrel following closely to the skin, continuing around the hip to the center of the tail.  The size of the blanket corresponds to the inches you just measured. For example, if your measurement comes out to 78 inches, then your horse wears a size 78.  A blanket measured this way allows four fingers at the chest and a few inches below the top of the tail.

4. Placement: Don’t make the legs straps too tight or else your horse’s hind legs will pull the blanket backwards and rub the chest. If they’re too loose, your horse can get its hind legs caught in them. It is safer criss-cross the straps for most horses.

5. Blanketing Your Horse: If your horse freaks when you try to pull the blanket over his head, you have two choices. The first is to unhook it entirely and place it gently over his back so he doesn’t freak out. Better: Work with a trainer to desensitize your horse to movements like this. It will make your horse braver, encourage him to trust your leadership, and make it immeasurably easier for the staff at your barn (or your friends) to blanket your horse for you.

   
  Mon Jan 15

Pleuropneumonia in Horses - shipping sickness

Over recent years, quite a number of valuable horses have developed acute infection within the lung and chest commonly referred to as 'travel sickness' or 'shipping disease'.
Horses that have raced or been subjected to strenuous exercise immediately prior to long distance travelling are particularly prone to developing pleuropneumonia, which if not recognised and treated early, is invariably debilitating and may be fatal.

 

Cause   Top Low grade viral infection, breathing contaminated air in poorly ventilated transports and the stress of travel appear to be the main underlying causes.
Travel stress includes:
  • noise
  • cramped spaces
  • high speed driving
  • swaying of trailers, and
  • inadequate rest stops.
    'Short tying' the head can lead to the spread of bacteria from the nose and mouth area into the deeper parts of the respiratory tract, predisposing the horse to travel sickness. The risk of travel sickness is increased if horses are unable to put their heads down to drain normal respiratory secretions.
    Travel sickness is also a problem in horses travelled by air over long distances. Studies have shown that general airborne contamination is highest at the rear of the aircraft and transports, and horses travelling at the rear are most likely to develop the condition.
    Transporting horses which are suffering from underlying viral disease, or are tired and dehydrated after racing or competition, increases the risk.
    Dusty feed and hay containing bacterial germs and moulds, and breathing in dust from roads, results in inhaled contamination, which overloads the lungs' defence system. Unfortunately, many modern 'streamlined' floats and horse transports are often poorly ventilated.
Symptoms   Top It is important to watch for and recognise the tell-tale signs early, especially during the few days following a long trip.
Horses with early pleuropneumonia:
  • become depressed
  • develop a fever
  • go off their feed, and
  • pant in shallow, rapid breaths.
    Early signs may be confused with colic, as horses resist moving, stand with the front legs apart, and paw the ground. As the condition worsens, the horse may turn to look at its painful chest.
    Immediate veterinary advice should be obtained. Unfortunately, once pleuropneumonia worsens, it is difficult to treat, and can result in death within 3-5 days.
Prevention   Top
  1. Always ensure that horses are cooled down, and given a drink before long distance travel. In very tired, dehydrated or stressed horses, long distance travel of over 12 hours duration should be delayed until they recover, preferably at least overnight.
  2. Ensure ventilation is sufficient to keep air flowing without causing chills. An adequate rate of air change is important in large transports carrying a number of horses over long distances.
  3. Provide dampened feed or pellets to reduce dust and airborne contamination. Lightly dampen hay, in particular, by wrapping a biscuit of hay in a wet chaff bag for 2-4 hours to reduce dust and other airborne contamination. This will increase palatability of hay and provide additional moisture during long trips. Locate feeders below chest bar height.
  4. Do not tie the head too short - give the horse as much space as possible to feel comfortable and be able to put its head down. Stallion dividers may be required to prevent horses squabbling during transport.
  5. Avoid transporting horses suffering from respiratory disease. If a horse has symptoms, do not transport it as it may infect others during the trip.
  6. Ensure the trailer is in good condition and level on the towbar. Drive steadily and smoothly. Keep the back flap down to reduce intake of swirling dust on dirt roads.
  7. Stop every 3-4 hours and open the trailer doors. If possible, unload and allow the horse(s) to walk around, or preferably graze or feed with the head down for at least 15-20 minutes. Provide access to drinking water at rest stops. A 60ml dose of Recharge over the tongue will replace electrolytes and stimulate drinking.
  8. If a horse has competed or raced hard, give it a day off after a long trip. Turning the horse into a grassy green paddock to graze with its head down for a few hours, or putting dampened feed in a bin at floor level, will encourage drainage of the respiratory system.
  9. After travelling a horse over a long distance, keep a careful watch for loss of appetite, depression, fever and obvious discomfort for the first few days. It is a good idea to monitor the horse's temperature morning and night for at least 3 days after long trips, and seek vet advice if the temperature is elevated (the normal body temperature of an adult horse is 36.5-38.5°C).
   
  Sat Jan 06

What is a Donkey? Are a donkey and jackass the same ?

Pertaining to animals, the answer is yes.

A donkey, an ass, and a burro, are all the same name for the same beast. Jackass, is merely the name for a male ass, while jennett, not jillass, is the name for a female ass.

The Ancient Egyptians domesticated the sturdy ass over 5,000 years ago, for use as transportation, and to transport their belongings and commodities. This form of cheap labor, of which there are many kinds, spread throughout the world, and uses of the ass expanded to include the skin off of the ass, the meat off of it's bones, and the actual export of the ass as a commodity.

The Somali wild ass, hailing from Somalia and elsewhere in Africa, is a prime example of the versatility of the ass, as these shy animals, living together in groups of 5-20, adapt well to the desert climate, and can exist on a diet of dry grass and shrubs. The over-depletion of the versatile Somali wild ass, however, explains its rarity today. Asian wild asses, for example, the Syrian wild ass, suffered a similar fate, and can no longer be found in Syria, and in other parts of the Middle East. Man has hunted the Nubian wild ass, a northeastern African type, once living from the Nile to the Red Sea, almost to the point of extinction. Certain groups are attempting to protect the few remaining asses from being hunted and killed.

The modern ass, a descendent of the Nubian wild ass, meets the same transportation needs in Mexico, and in Central America, as it did in Ancient Egypt.

A jennet is normally pregnant for about 12 months, though the gestation period varies from 11 to 14 months,[5] and usually gives birth to a single foal. Births of twins are rare, though less so than in horses.[5] About 1.7 percent of donkey pregnancies result in twins; both foals survive in about 14 percent of those.[citation needed]

Although jennets come into heat within 9 or 10 days of giving birth, their fertility remains low and it is usual to wait one or two further oestrous cycles before rebreeding. Because of this and the longer gestation period, donkey breeders do not expect to obtain a foal every year, as horse breeders often do, but may plan for three foals in four years.[5]

Donkeys can interbreed with other members of the Equidae family, and are commonly interbred with horses. The hybrid between a jack and a mare is a mule, valued as a working and riding animal in many countries. Some large donkey breeds such as the Asino di Martina Franca, the Baudet de Poitou and the Mammoth Jack are raised only for mule production. The hybrid between a stallion and a jennet is a hinny, and is less common. Like other inter-species hybrids, mules and hinnies are usually sterile.[5]

   
  Wed Oct 25

Andalusian Horse

OVERVIEW

The Andalusian horse breed is highly respected and well known from the medieval period. The Andalusian breed of horses is very ancient breed which came into existence when there was a cross between the Spanish stock horses and the Oriental horses. This all happens when the Moors came into Spain around 18th century with the Oriental horses. Due to the influence of the Spanish horses the Andalusian horses possess a great physical appearance and that is why the Andalusian horses are one of the likable riding horses in the world.

PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION

As we know that the Andalusian horses have the characteristics of Spanish and the oriental breed of horses and due to that the Andalusian horses have phenomenal physical impact and the availability of the Andalusian horses in various colors such as gray, white and bay make it more special. In describing the physical qualities of the Andalusian horse the most impressive portion is its height. The average height of the Andalusian horse ranges from 15 – 16 hands which mean that it is long horse with great masculine body structure. The proportions of the other parts of the body according to its height are set in excellent manner. The chest of the Andalusian horse is big and the ears of the Andalusian horse are small. The nose of the Andalusian horse is convex in shape and the legs are long and the overall appearance of the Andalusian horse is quite energetic. The mindset of the Andalusian horse is quite calm and the Andalusian horse has a skill to learn at a good pace.

ORIGIN

The Andalusian horses have got its name from the Andalusia which is one of the states of Spain. The Andalusian is the descendants of the Iberian horse and Barb horse and after that the oriental breeds of horses have played an important role in developing the Andalusian breed of horses. In the early ages the Andalusian horses were take care by the monks and the quality of nobleness is found in them. Many of us considered the Andalusian horses as the noblest horse in the world.

INTERESTING FACTS

The history of the Andalusian horses is full of interesting facts, right from its beginning as they came into existence after cross between two great breed of horses, then they have been developed and trained by the monks. The fact which is most important and impressive is that the monks are the excellent trainers and they maintained the purity of the breed at a very good level. The Andalusian horse gets excellent physical qualities from its contributor breeds and the Andalusian horse gets the quality of nobleness from the monks. Due to its excellent physical qualities the Andalusian horses were included in the army of the Napoleon and it was one of the causes which blusters the purity of the breed of Andalusian horse

   
  Mon Oct 16

What is a PONY ?

po·ny

/ˈpōnē/
 
Noun
A horse of a small breed.

A pony is a breed of horse which has a number of distinct traits, most notably a small size. Numerous pony breeds can be found all over the world, and some well known representatives of this equine group include Shetland, Welsh, and Connemara ponies. Just like their larger relatives, ponies have been used for work, sport, and pleasure for thousands of years, and they are incredibly diverse creatures.

A pony is not merely a small horse. There are several distinct physical differences between horses and ponies which make the two easy to distinguish. Ponies tend to very stocky, with thick bones, wide chests, and small heads. Their manes, tails, and coats are often thicker than those of horses, perhaps because many pony breeds evolved in colder climates where a thick layer of insulation would be vital.

Ponies are also incredibly strong for their size, thanks to their muscular bodies. A mature pony can sometimes pull the same weight as a draft horse, for example, and many ponies are capable of carrying adult riders. Pound for pound, ponies are much stronger than horses. They are also known for being extremely hardy, and tolerant of a wide range of conditions including extreme cold. The pony is also famous for being extremely intelligent, and sometimes a bit stubborn.

Showing purposes

14.2 hh and up is a horse

Sizes and Scales:Ponies are 14.2 hands (abbreviated hh) (1.47 m) at the withers or smaller, while a horse is anything taller than 14.2 hh at the withers.

What's in a Name? The term "pony" can be used generally for any small horse, regardless of its actual measurements. It is interesting to note, however, that some equine breeds are not considered ponies, even if they are under 14.2 hh, because of their fiery temperament.


All For Show:
For showing purposes, ponies are grouped into small, medium, and large sizes. Small ponies are 12.2 hh and under, medium ponies are over 12.2 but no taller than 13.2 hh (1.27 to 1.37 m), and large ponies are over 13.2 hh but no taller than 14.2 hh (1.37 to 1.47 m).

Note, however, that miniature horses are not the same as ponies. A miniature horse is in fact much smaller, required to be no taller than 8.2 hh (86cm) at the withers. There are also miniature pony breeds.

 

Wild Ponies?There are several wild breeds of pony, and these have often been captured and bred for various purposes, especially in Britain and Ireland.

These wild breeds along with domestic breeds were used as "pit ponies" hauling loads of coal up from the mines, for freight transport, as children's mounts and for entertainment, and later as competitors and performers in their own right. They were also ridden (and continue to be ridden) by adults, as ponies are usually very strong.

Ponies are often said to be mean, untrustworthy, spooky or devious. Properly trained ponies can be gentle, and are appropriate mounts for children who are learning to ride.

The Riding Pony was developed in the United Kingdom, and was such a success that it is now bred all over the world. They are excellent show ponies. The breed is an extremely elegant animal, more like a small horse than a pony. It has a small head and small, neat ears.

They are compact, with sloping shoulders and a narrow front. Their feet are tough and they possess strong limbs. They are well-proportioned with comfortable gaits and free-flowing movement.

What's Your Type? There are three types of ponies:

* The show pony: super-elegant miniature show hack with pony features
* The show hunter: similar to the show pony, but with more substance
* The working hunter: stockier, and more workmanlike

Shetland ponies, also known as shelts, are small (on average up to 42 inches to the wither) but strong for their size. The Shetland Pony originated from the Shetland Islands - North East of Scotland.

The ancient ponies' roots are unknown, though it is believed that they are related to the ancient Scandinavian ponies from when the islands were joined with Scandinavia
(up until 8000 BC).

They were probably influenced by the Celtic Pony, taken by the Celts between 2000 and 1000 BC. The harsh climate and scarce food developed the ponies into extremely hardy animals. They were first used for carrying peat and ploughing. Then, in the mid-19th century, when laws were passed prohibiting children from working in coal mines, thousands of Shetlands traveled to Mainland Britain to be 'pit ponies,' working underground their whole lives
hauling coal.

Versatility in a Pony: The United States mid-west coal mines also imported some of these animals. The Shetland Pony Stud Book Society was started in 1890 to maintain purity and encourage high-quality animals. In 1956, the Shetland Islands Premium Stallion Scheme was formed to subsidize high-quality registered stallions to improve the breeding stock. Today, Shetlands are used as children's ponies and are also featured in the Shetland Pony Grand National, galloping around the course with their young jockeys.

 

What sizes do pony halters & bridles come in?
We have labeled all of our halters and bridles to fit the typical pony of the size mentioned. These are guidelines only! Sometimes an animal will have a smaller or bigger head for his size, plus different breeds have different shaped heads. For example, Welsh ponies usually have small muzzles and broad foreheads. Stallions will have much larger jowels as will Arabians or part Arabs.

Size Height Notes
Small Pony 12.2 hands and under Sometimes called 'Shetland'
Medium Pony Over 12.2 and up to 13.2 hands  
Large Pony Over 13.2 and up to 14.2 hands Often equivalent to 'Horse Yearling'
Cob Over 14 and up to 15.2 hands For larger Larges and Small Horses
Small/Med 12 - 13 hands For larger Smalls and smaller Mediums
Med/Large 13 -14 hands For larger Mediums and smaller Larges
Large Pony/Cob 14 - 15 hands For larger Larges and Small Horses

How do I measure for a pony halter?
To measure for a halter, use a flexible measuring tape and take the following measurements. You can then email them to us and we can check the measurements against any of our products. We have labeled all of our halters to fit the typical pony of the size mentioned (see first FAQ)

  1. The distance from an inch or two below the point of the cheekbone on one side, over the crown, to the same point on the other side. The starting and end points are where the halter side rings will be.
  2. The distance around the nose (circumference) at the points mentioned above.
 

How do I measure for a pony bridle?
To measure for a bridle, use a flexible measuring tape and take the following measurements. You can then email them to us and we can check the measurements against any of our products. We have labeled all of our bridles to fit the typical pony of the size mentioned (see first FAQ)

  • The distance from the corner of the mouth on one side, over the crown, to the same point on the other side
  • The distance around the nose (circumference) where you want your bridle's noseband to lie
  • The distance around the throat and over the crown where the throat latch goes. Make this measurement as loose as the throat latch will be
  1. The browband measurement from behind the ear, across the forehead, to the same place on the other side (where the browband will be)
  2. The type of bit you will be using (Dee, Eggbutt, Full Cheek, etc.) The size of the rings in various bits will affect the fit of your bridle
 

How do I measure for a pony in-hand bridle?
Please send us the following measurements, following the diagram, to ensure a good fit. Also, if you're ordering a bridle that uses a bit, please indicate the type of bit you'll be using including the size of the ring.

  1. From the corner of the mouth on one side, over the poll, to the corner of the mouth on the other side
  2. Noseband - measure completely around nose where noseband will be - about two fingers below cheekbone
  3. Throat - from the poll, completely around, going under the throat. (fairly snug)
  4. Browband - from behind the ear, across the forehead, to the same place on the other side
  5. Distance between splits -From where the browband meets the bridle (about 1" below the ear), over the poll, to the same place on the other side


   
   
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